Scary leg pain resolved with calcium

nutritional therapy, self-experiment, supplements, symptoms and conditions, Uncategorized
(This is a repeat of a 2011 post.) Before my gluten-freedom (which commenced April 4, 1998) I became aware of a constant, aching bone pain in my legs -- not a tissue or a muscle or a joint thing -- that was most noticeable when doing the dishes or standing in line at the airport. In 2000 or so I realized that if I didn't take vitamin B-complex, along with biotin and vitamin B12, for two days, by the third day my legs would hurt so badly my jaw would do that shaking thing and I'd start breathing in the kind of way that makes your fellow shoppers at the grocery store edge away from you. Since I took B-complex/etc. every morning for years, though, I sort of forgot about…
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Successes and failures treating chemical sensitivities

nutritional therapy, supplements, symptoms and conditions
(Last updated July 2022.) I first noticed that I was reacting to some chemical substances around 2002, when I developed splitting headaches from paint used in my apartment, even the low-VOC (volatile organic compounds) stuff. Around the same time, wearing mascara and lipstick became unbearable. My eyes would become blurry and my lips cracked. My lips were pretty much blue from low iron so the no-lipstick look did not suit me. Vitamin B6 a brief success Several months of taking vitamin B6 got rid of the reaction to paint, and eventually I could wear my usual drugstore mascara and lipstick again ... for a few months. Luckily I was able to find health-food store versions that I continue to tolerate. (The reaction to paint never returned, actually.) In 2014, toward…
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I tried to detox lead and all I got was this stupid vertigo

interactions, nutritional therapy, self-experiment, side effects, symptoms and conditions, treatments
I developed vertigo after my second dose of DMSA treatment for lead chelation. For the next four weeks I had trouble moving quickly, standing up, going down stairs, etc., with no signs of it abating. Eventually I happened upon a comment on a heavy metal detox forum (on Yahoo, where untold gazillabytes of valuable information are inaccessible due to craptastic design) indicating that some people can't process sulfur due to insufficient body stores of molybdenum. Most approaches to lead detox involve sulfur, and DMSA is a walloping dose of sulfur. In fact, one study I found says that eating a whole lotta garlic can chelate lead. So I took 2,000 mcgs (2 mgs) of Mo the next day and the vertigo was gone the following evening. More notes on molybdenum:…
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Stopping sugar cravings with essential oils

essential oils, nutritional therapy, self-experiment, side effects, symptoms and conditions
As mentioned in this February 2013 post, my sugar cravings -- usually in the form of a particular ratio of chocolate, fat, and sugar, but occasionally reaching batshit levels where I'll eat a pint of ice cream while standing in front of the fridge -- have been extremely resistant to my nutritional-therapy tinkering. 5-HTP worked like a miracle for a week, then gave me splitting headaches and insomnia, and vitamin B6 got my cravings down from insanely bad to the usual infuriatingly bad, and that's about the extent of my success. Out of curiosity more than hope, I clicked on a Kindle link to Break Sugar Cravings or Addiction, Feel Full, Lose Weight: An Astonishing Essential Oil Method by Kathy Heshelow. The book took me all of 20 minutes to…
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All the pills I’ve loved before

nutritional therapy, supplements, symptoms and conditions
Here's a roundup of the vitamin and mineral supplements that have had the most dramatic effect on my various health annoyances. After the recent media exposure on the Target/Walgreens/GNC supplements debacle, allow me to reiterate that I operate on the theory that nutritional deficiencies are often behind health issues and that correcting the deficiency can correct the health issue. Unfortunately, with a very few exceptions -- ferritin, vitamin D, B12 if you know what you're doing, a few others -- there is no way to test for deficiencies except to try a supplement and see what happens. The medical establishment would love to have you believe otherwise, but alas, it is not true. And we won't even get into the problem of gauging what a normal test result is, even…
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Tips on self-experimenting with nutritional therapy

nutritional therapy, self-experiment
Don't worry about proving anything to anyone. If you're hoping to demonstrate to someone else the validity of nutritional therapy, or prove that your health complaints were not imagined, don't bother. Save that time and energy and use it on yourself instead. Evaluate a trial not just on how you feel, but on what you find yourself doing. More than a few times when I assumed a new supplement regimen was having no effect, I later realized I had run twice the number of errands that week, or checked three-year-old items off my to-do list. Evaluate a trial based on how you feel when you stop a supplement, too. It's valuable info. You might consider repeating the stop-and-start a few times. A bad reaction to a supplement is also good…
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